The State Theatre in Falls Church is a great venue!

State Theatre Interior

I stopped by the State Theatre the other day to meet with the director, and while I was waiting I took a quick shot of the interior with my iPhone.  The drummer for Almost Queen was practicing (deafening), but I was thinking what a great place it is for a comedy show!
Not only that, the State Theatre serves delicious appetizers and desserts, which will all be free for you if you come to the NAMI of Northern Virginia Comedy Night with Jane Condon and Johnny Rizzo!
I have also collected some great raffle prizes and silent auction items.  Many gift certificates for area restaurants, and other surprises.
So, buy your tickets at http://www.missiontix.com/events/product/14971/nami-fundraiser and be there at 6:30PM for a great night out!

 

 

 

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Comedy Night at the State Theatre Helps Children with Mental Illness

Moby with poster

Moby wants to go to the show!

Arlington and Fairfax Counties have close to half a million children under the age of 18 as of 2011.   A significant number have emotional problems or mental illness. NAMI of Northern Virginia offers many free programs to educate and support families who have children that fit in this category. As an all-volunteer organization that hopes to expand to help all families in need, we hold fundraisers to raise the money required to employ a program director and to train volunteers.    To read more about their programs, check http://www.NAMI-NorthernVirginia.org
The following article was taken from the National NAMI site. The statistics for children are quite sobering.

Facts on Children’s Mental Health in America

The reports by the U.S. Surgeon General1 and the New Freedom Commission on Mental Health offer great hope to the millions of children and adolescents living with mental illness and their families.2 Through appropriate identification, evaluation, and treatment, children and adolescents living with mental illness can lead productive lives. They can achieve success in school, in work and in family life. Nonetheless, the overwhelming majority of children with mental disorders fail to be identified, lack access to treatment or supports and thus have a lower quality of life. Stigma persists and millions of young people in this country are left behind.

Prevalence of Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders

  • Four million children and adolescents in this country suffer from a serious mental disorder that causes significant functional impairments at home, at school and with peers. Of children ages 9 to 17, 21 percent have a diagnosable mental or addictive disorder that causes at least minimal impairment.1
  • Half of all lifetime cases of mental disorders begin by age 14. Despite effective treatments, there are long delays, sometimes decades, between the first onset of symptoms and when people seek and receive treatment. An untreated mental disorder can lead to a more severe, more difficult to treat illness and to the development of co-occurring mental illnesses.3
  • In any given year, only 20 percent of children with mental disorders are identified and receive mental health services.4

Consequences of Untreated Mental Disorders in Children and Adolescents

Suicide

  • Suicide is the third leading cause of death in youth ages 15 to 24. More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, birth defects, stroke, pneumonia, influenza and chronic lung disease combined.5 Over 90 percent of children and adolescents who commit suicide have a mental disorder.6
  • In the United States in the year 2002, almost 4,300 young people ages 10 to 24 died by suicide.7
  • States spend nearly $1 billion annually on medical costs associated with completed suicides and suicide attempts by youth up to 20 years of age.8

School Failure

  • Approximately 50% of students age 14 and older who are living with a mental illness drop out of high school. This is the highest dropout rate of any disability group.9

Juvenile and Criminal Justice Involvement

  • Youth with unidentified and untreated mental disorders also tragically end up in jails and prisons. According to a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health—the largest ever undertaken—an alarming 65 percent of boys and 75 percent of girls in juvenile detention have at least one mental illness.10 We are incarcerating youth living with mental illness, some as young as eight years old, rather than identifying their conditions early and intervening with appropriate treatment.

Higher Health Care Utilization

  • When children with untreated mental disorders become adults, they use more health care services and incur higher health care costs than other adults. Left untreated, childhood disorders are likely to persist and lead to a downward spiral of school failure, limited or non-existent employment opportunities and poverty in adulthood. No other illnesses harm so many children so seriously.

Early Identification, Evaluation and Treatment are Essential to Recovery and Resiliency

  • Research shows that early identification and intervention can minimize the long-term disability of mental disorders.2
  • Mental disorders in children and adolescents are real and can be effectively treated, especially when identified and treated early.
  • Research has yielded important advances in the development of effective treatment for children and adolescents living with mental illness. Early identification and treatment prevents the loss of critical developmental years that cannot be recovered and helps youth avoid years of unnecessary suffering.11
  • Early and effective mental health treatment can prevent a significant proportion of delinquent and violent youth from future violence and crime.12 It also enables children and adolescents to succeed in school, to develop socially and to fully experience the developmental opportunities of childhood.

July 2010


1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Mental Health:  A Report of the Surgeon General.  Rockville,
MD:  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health, 1999.

A Message from Jane to DC friends

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Jane emulates Billy Eliot!

 

Hi to all my DC friends,
I am back in your area again on Tuesday, Oct. 23rd.
I’ll be at the State Theatre in Falls Church, VA.
(Last year I did my one-person show there.
Big thanks to everyone who came!!!
This year, it’s straight comedy. No sad stories, I promise.)
I’m co-headlining with Johnny Rizzo, the funniest guy in CT.
The one who took me aside the first night I got on stage
at Treehouse Comedy Club and said, “You’re pretty good kid.
Let me give you a little advice…Get out of this business
while you still can because it’s very addictive.”
He’s right! And we’re both still doing it.
Here’s the info:
http://www.missiontix.com/events/product/14971/nami-fundraiser
It’s a fundraiser for NAMI-Northern Virginia.
NAMI is the National Alliance on Mental Illness–a good cause!
The show is produced by my talented friend and Wellesley classmate
Kathy Tyler Conklin!
Hope to see you there.
Best always, Jane

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Jane returns from a Harry Potter movie

 

A Little About Comedian Jane Condon

Jane Condon

Comedian and mom JANE CONDON lives in Greenwich, Connecticut, but she’s still a nice person. She has two boys, otherwise everything’s fine. Since she’s from a blue-collar town (Brockton) in Massachusetts, she likes to make fun of Greenwich. She loves to tell stories about her adventures (mostly survival tales) with her boys.

Condon was named one of 10 Comedy Best Bets in Back Stage’s annual comedy issue (2001). She has appeared on ABC-TV’s “The View” and Lifetime TV’s “Girls’ Night Out” and FOX-TV’s series finale of “24.”

On Last Comic Standing

She won the Ladies of Laughter Contest in 2004.

She won Audience Favorite (NY) on NBC’s “Last Comic Standing.” In May 2011, Jane was the commencement speaker at Wellesley College (her alma mater). In May 2012, she spoke at the University of New Haven graduation.

In the Spring of 2011 she had her one-woman show JANIE CONDON: RAW & UNCHAINED playing nightly for several weeks at the St. Luke’s Theater just off Broadway in New York City.  This was the same show that friends of NAMI saw in Falls Church in February 2011.

NAMI of Northern Virginia is so lucky to have Jane as an avid supporter!

Janie Condon: Raw & Unchained

Off Broadway in Janie Condon: Raw & Unchained